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Posted August 8, 2016

Annual report: After School Matters reaches further in 2015


As Mellody Hobson (Board Chair) and Mary Ellen Caron (Chief Executive Officer) point out in their newest annual report, After School Matters has done it again. The storied nonprofit, now celebrating its 25th year, celebrates “continued expansion, growing demand, and transformative opportunities.” From July 2014 through June 2015, After School Matters provided 15,000 teens — an increase of 1,000 students from the previous year — with 23,000 opportunities for discovery, learning, and growth.

To underscore ASM’s ever-increasing reach, Jell designed this year’s report using a landscape format. Full-page photos of actively engaged teens and their mentors — along with extra-large infographics and stats — stretch dramatically across the wide pages. The impact, both visual and social, is hard to miss.

Jell is now in our third year of collaboration with the leaders and staff of After School Matters, working on a variety of branding and marketing projects. (You may remember our story on their previous annual report.) Over these years, we’ve learned quite a bit about their ambitious goals and the daunting challenges they face. They want everyone to know that while their successes and impact are indeed cause for celebration, there are still thousands of teens who apply each year but cannot yet be accommodated. We encourage all Chicago citizens who are concerned about our city’s future to read the 2015 Annual Report “Reaching Further” and consider supporting this very worthy organization.

Founded in 1991 by then-Chicago First Lady Maggie Daley and former Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs Commissioner Lois Weisberg — originally as “gallery37” — After School Matters offers underserved Chicago teens a safe space and opportunity for growth through life-changing after-school and summer programs. No other organization offers these benefits to these teens at such scale. Learn more about how your support can make a difference to Chicago teens in need.

 
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